Sharing knowledge and my original work

Posts tagged “form

I Am Inspired By

I am inspired by animals, insects, plants, trees and water. Well I guess just being alive is an inspiration. I just don’t know how not to be inspired, I have always lived my life this way.

My inspiration is all around me. I love color, the way light and shadow can changes the same space at different times of the day. Taking a colorful object drawing it in pencil to bring out the contrast of the gray scale from light to dark.

This example of just one of an object that inspired me to take immediate action. The other day my neighbor stops me during my walk to show me something interesting. It was a two foot hornets’ nest. What a great opportunity. I was so glad I had my phone with me. I took a lot of pictures. As I took the pictures I considered the different eye levels so I could capture every vantage point.

Being aware of how the light played on the nest I wanted pictures to reference for the art I would create.  I was so inspired I knew I would get home a start drawing right away.

As I walk home with my dog Grace. I was already putting together some compositions in my head on the best way I could represent this amazing subject. I knew that it would take me some time to execute a painting, so I decided to do some drawing when I got home.

I am so inspired by the shape and the size of the massive nest. I decided to draw it before I paint it.

Sketch it out

I am inspired!

 

Light and Shadows defined

Starting to define light and shadow.

 

Are you inpired!

Filling in the form with shape of texture.

 

Inspired yet?

Filling in the form with pattern in each section defines the object.

 

Inspired buy light and shadow

Continue with defining light, shadow and pattern.

 

Inspired to it paint.

The balance between light and shadow brings the details to life.

 

Inspired to and color

The next step is to clean this up mat it, frame it and add it to the Gallery

 

As you can see from my quick drawing the picture area is full of interest without adding the colors of the nest. I was inspired by shape, texture, light and shadow. This drawing has inspired me to do another from a different eye level.

 

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Teaching And Art

As I get ready to embark on another year of creativity. I can’t wait to start a new project. Teaching and art is what I  do. I enjoy teaching I just don’t do enough of it.

Every day is a blessing and I am truly grateful. I found that putting out content on a teaching blog is not as fulfilling or easy as I thought it would be. I need the inter action teacher to student.

So I have decided that the best thing I can do is to go back to that one on one experience that I find in the classroom. I do this through our public library.

I do private teaching as well. The things I love to do above anything else is painting, drawing and sculpture. They say if you do the thing you love you will never feel like you’re working. Okay that for me is creating beautiful works of art.

I have to say that I still believe I have given you may readers a great foundation. Composition is the key to any great work of art. I believe if you have a great foundation you can build anything.

Over the next few weeks I will be adding more work to my gallery and incorporating a shopping cart. It’s time for me to take what I’ve learned to push my site to a higher level. This will take me some time do to the fact that I am going to do what I really love and one finger typing in my option sucks.

Finding ways to keep motivated are not hard when you’re doing what you love. For me there’re subjects all around me. I am inspired by life, shadows that form shapes, light that defines, space that creates perspective and colors that dance across the world bring it alive.

I have always been driven to express myself though teaching and art. Showing off my gift as an artist is opening up to you. I want you to see as a viewer how I see the subjects I paint and draw to capture a moment that has trigger an emotional response in me. Sharing this is bringing you into that space. Teaching is showing you how I build that space.

Emotion is the root of all humans it can be found in this space. It is an invitation for most artist to start a conversation or maybe provoke feelings of joy, sadness or excitement. Teaching is showing the student how to bring themselves into their work.

Artist do what works best for them and go from there.

bwxx

 

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The Last Step To A Great Composition

Ready to complete this composition. We have constructed a great foundation for our vision by practicing different picture areas, line and depth. Now put some personality into the illusion. The final thing to conceder is value.

Value is the overall mood of the illusion. It is set by the darkness and lightness of the artist vision. Some artist consider this the most important part of creating a great composition. We call overall value or the key.

Low key is pictures that are overall dark in value and leave you with a feeling of sadness uneasiness and despair.

High key is picture that are overall light in value and leave you with a feeling of happiness, safety and lively.

The value of your picture should be consistent with in the picture area. Your composition is strongest with the overall key the same. We are creating a believable illusion, trying to direct the viewer’s eye to the focal point. Taking time to think about the value of the finished work. We do this by placing the gray and dark tones in areas that will support the key.

A rainy day can be drawn or painted to support a high key by making the sky bright with limited dark clouds and maybe a rainbow that formed from the sunlight direction. This leaves most of us the feeling that we are coming out of the stormy weather. A low key rainy day can be drawn or painted with grayer and darker clouds with no bright area leaving us with the feeling of despair.

A bull fight can set in a high key showing the excitement of the fight with a wide range of contrasting values from the lightest to the darkest. A low key drawing or painting of the same fight can be done with a somber tone by controlling the contrast between tones.

So as we explore the value or key of the picture area there are a few things to think of. Using different tones of equal value are too closely related and will leave your picture with no center of interests. Using in-between values of gray or color we are creating contrast between tones. This will set your center of interest away from the background and even thought your other elements may stand out they are less important.

Here are some things to consider when planning the picture area. The basic value patterns simply come down to this light against dark, dark against light, dark and *halftone against light and light against dark halftone.

Sometimes there is a clear choice with patterns that are clear and sharp. The challenge comes in when you want to create an overall value that is well balanced and leaves your viewer with a satisfied feeling.

You need to solve the pattern between the relationship between the elements and the key. You want all to support the center of interest. Trying out different value sketches to see what makes the most sense. This clears up the confusion and supports a believable illusion.

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Elements of Composition In Action

The artist that tackle action as the focal point must take a careful and sensitive placement of all the elements in the picture area. Composition is drawing a clear, sharp and simple foreground and background with the subjects in the middle ground.

Come up with a composition that is subtle is the goal. In this example there are lovers in the park sitting at a picnic table. Keeping the four elements of composition in mind as you build your vision on paper.

The over-all picture areas composition is filled with the shape of the main characters to include the two people and the picnic table. How do you utilize the picture area with a form containing the main subjects? Can you have the two people stand out in the form? The answer is yes but the placement is critical because the line they form will be subtle.

The two-dimensional pattern you are drawing is important. The challenge is to create depth inside the form. You can create a strong feeling of depth. Making the figures and the action stand out by setting them at the far end of the picnic table will lead your eye in this composition. The perspective comes alive with a dark table, carry your eyes back in the space to the figures creating the action.

Now think about how the invisible line in this composition and how it effects the picture the area. The contrast between the invisible circular lines and the obvious straight lines of the table along with the landscape will draw your attention to the center of interest. Pay attention to the relationship of the figures. They create the top of the form.

Their heads are facing each other and they are holding hands creating the circular line. This invisible circular line stands out against the straight lines. The vertical lines converge to the vanishing point just beyond the figures heads. The horizon runs three quarters of the picture area just about eye level of the two figures. All hard lines lead to the center of interest.

The foundation is in place. The value of the key is what sets the tone or mood of this drawing. The contrast between dark and light, between the background and the figures heads will draw your eye to their faces. All the other dark and light areas are not in strong contrast blending in value with the foreground and background. The composition is strong because all elements come together to sends you to the center of interest. The subtle choices made by the artist to use a middle key directly affect where your eye travels in the picture area.

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Line A Tool

Artist are taught to see line as a tool in composition. We learn to curve it to create shapes, stack them to create texture and see it even when its not there.

Most people think of line as a straight, curvy or a combination of objects one after another forming a line. As an artist we use line to define shapes and to control direction within a picture area.

The lines I’m talking about are the lines that create motion. They establish a sense of direction just as a road takes you somewhere. Think about how line, not only the outlines of the objects but also the line or direction your eye moves through the composition.

Every element in your drawing has visible and invisible lines that will work within the composition. This adds interest and direction and is achieved by the placement, size and the angles of the elements in your vision.

You can use directional objects to direct the eye down line in the road, tree limb, a table, hallway, sofa, room or table. These props established in your drawing setting a clear path for your eye to follow.

Take a man walking out of a forest you can draw this in many ways. To make it more interesting you can have fallen trees in the background as if to say he cut them down cutting a path back into the forest. Is he carrying an ax or wood for the fire in the foreground? Does the tree canapé or tee line support the lines of the composition?

To take advantage of the line or direction of your viewer’s eye can be worked out through doing rough sketches. You want to see wear the main lines or direction lead your viewers eye with in the picture area. You don’t want to lead them out of the picture area. These rules apply with the lines of the composition just as they do in the rules of common sense.

Apply these rules:

  • Don’t divide the picture in have by crowding everything to one side or the other. Use the whole picture area.
  • Don’t line things up its boring. Create more interest by overlapping or varying the positions of the elements inside the picture area.
  • Don’t crowd the bottom. Use the whole picture area.
  • Don’t center everything. Vary the placement of the objects in the picture frame.
  • Don’t leave a hole. Use the space in the picture area. Leaving a hole becomes the center of interest.
  • Don’t just let objects touch they may appear to be resting on each other. Overlapping the objects create a sense of order and balance.

Line is a tool that we use as artist and to controlling the movement of your viewer’s eye around and into your picture area. It is like a director making a movie. The action takes place inside the picture area. All elements support the composition. Invisible and visible lines that lead to the point of interest.

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Creating A Three-Dimensional Drawing

An artists’ drawing is subject to the opinion of the viewer. The artist who is creating a realistic illusion will want the perspective to be correct and the arrangement of the subjects or objects to be believable.

Start by establishing your eye level and the vanishing point. Now work out the size, placement and proportion of the largest forms and then start carefully detailing the drawing. The largest forms must be established in their space before you can concern yourself with the smaller forms or the details.

The largest form or shape will have many smaller forms or shapes that make up the details. Each form must be in an accurate perspective. Remember all parallel lines meet at the vanishing points on the horizon if you were to draw them in.

Where your subjects are fruit or people the placement of each form will draw your eye to the area you direct in the illusion. Once your largest form is established you will want to add the rest of the forms. Keep in mind that each object and their detail will supported the idea. Every drawing is telling or leading you into a story.

Things to remember when drawing form.

  • Leave enough space between forms when one is in front of the other. If you draw both objects through you will see if the first object leaves enough room for the second and so on.
  • Learn to make ellipses by drawing them in a rectangle. They do not have pinched or flatten edges.
  • Draw a form through constructing the mass before you start the shading or detailing.
  • An interesting drawing with two or more forms has a great composition, it will lead your eye through the illusion into a three-dimensional space.
  • To create a three-dimensional form show the light, a middle tone and a dark space.
  • After establishing the largest shape make sure the horizon lines recede in depth. So the side closer is larger than the one further away.
  • Make sure that your view of objects on the same plane have the same eye level or view point.
  • When drawing an object pick the view that will make it most recognizable.

We have explored form or shape so we can create a three-dimensional drawing and a convincing illusion. You are telling a story of the object or subjects and how they relate in the space they occupy. Having an accurate perspective is essential.

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Composition Is Building Your Vision On Paper

Composition is creating a well thought out vision on paper or on canvas. It starts with the artist seeing something that inspires them to record it so others can enjoy it too . Artist  combine form and space to create a whole picture.

Artist arrange the elements to create a perfect harmonious picture. We are creating a visual arrangement. Our main purpose is to create an illusion by the placement, size and value of each object. Paying attention to how it relates to the space and what importance we give each.

A well composed picture will give the viewer a sense of order or beauty. The viewer may not realize how or why, they know that are satisfied with the results.

As artist we plan out every aspect of the composition. We are telling a story. What is the basic idea? What is the mood we are trying to communicate? We draw the subjects or objects that support and clarify our idea and throw out things that may confuse or distract from it.

You may start your picture with the main subject larger and bolder than the other objects. Placing it in a position of importance. You may even decide to draw it bolder, larger or clearer than it is in real life. Drawing less important objects lighter, smaller or fading away in to the back ground. Just by adjusting the position or size of the objects he can have the viewer linger and find the most meaningful part of the picture.

The artist is creating a focal point or center of interest by directly or indirectly by leading the viewer’s eye to where he wants it to go. He will also use light and shadow to draw your eye to the point of interest.

The artist takes into account where to use a horizontal or vertical picture. He may just want to dramatize the objects or subjects in their natural form. For instance drawing giraffes in a vertical picture will emphasize the height of the subjects.

These are the basic principles in developing a well composed picture. Practicing these principles will help you portray a clear, sharper expression of your idea.

Composition is taking your idea to the highest level by exploring and focusing on what is the most important element of the story you’re trying to tell in a picture. Taking the less important elements and arranging them to support the focal point.

A director creates a movie around a person, place, or thing.  You are the director of the picture you’re creating on a piece of paper or canvas.

 

 

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Position Is What Matters

Everything looks different depending on the position of the objects in your drawing and your eye level. So when you get ready to draw you must decide on the viewpoint you want to project in your drawing.

Every form you draw will change its appearance as you change your eye level or viewpoints. Our eye-level is seeing the base of the forms on the same level. A hilltop view is when you can see the front surface that the forms are resting on and the space between them. This view is the same as if you were standing on a hilltop looking down. A bird’s eye view is when you can see the surface the forms are resting on and the tops of the forms. Always remember as your view changes so does the appearance of the form.

As you change your view point you are seeing the difference between the form and how it changes its appearance in its space. This is the basic principles of perspective.

The further an object or part of an object is from your eye the smaller it appears. There are no exceptions to this rule. The height, weight and thickness of each form decreases in proportion and so does the space between.

They all seem to decrease in an obvious direction a definite level or height. This is known as the horizon. A natural horizon is where the sky and the ground meet but it is not the true horizon. Your true horizon is your own eye level. It can change depending on your height. It is always what is directly out in front of your eyes without moving your head up or down.

Looking down a street, a rug or a hallway notice the parallel lines of the forms gets smaller and smaller the further away they are from you and  they seem to connect. If you draw a straight line on either side of the object and converge these lines the will meet in the middle this is called the * vanishing point.

These lines are easier to see in a street, a pool or a freshly plowed field. You have to train your brain to see the converging line no matter the size of the form. Start by imaging invisible lines off the edges of all objects around you.

Your drawing may only have one vanishing point which will guide you to keep the diminishing objects in correct perspective. This one vanishing point located anywhere on your drawing depending on your eye level. Objects close to you will all ways seem larger and the ones further away will seem smaller even if they are the same actual size form.

This exercise is to help train your brain to observe how the objects it relates to the space it occupies.

Take three or four of the same object and the same size, place them down a table or a hallway. Now draw them, but first find the vanishing point buy drawing the horizon line lightly on your paper. Now draw the form of the object closest to you. Draw a straight light lines off the edge of the object to the horizon will give you its perspective. Where these lines meet is your vanishing point. Every one of the objects in this drawing will get smaller the closer it is drawn to the vanishing point. If the object is in front of your vanishing point you can draw a light line off the form to the horizon. This will show you the perspective of the same object and how it relates to the space and surface area.

Then you can have two point perspective, it is when you have more than one vanishing points on one horizon line. There are two sets of parallel which appear to converge to its own vanishing point. This will show off angles when we are drawing a view of a corner. The vanishing points may or may not be on your paper. Drawing buildings, boxes and interiors on an angle will have parallel lines converging to the left and right vanishing points.

*Vanishing point 1.) A point of disappearance, cessation, or extinction: His patience had reached the vanishing point. 2.) In the study of perspective in art) that point toward which receding parallel lines appear to converge.

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Keep It In Perspective

It is important that your drawings are in perspective. Are you convincing to the viewer? Do this by controlling the *proportions of the objects your drawing. We know that object closer to use are larger than the ones that are further away from use.

When you are building a drawing remember to have your forms in *proportion before you set in the details. Sometimes things just may not seem right, trust your instinct and check all the proportions most of the time that’s the problem. Every object should relate to the space it occupies and to each other

You would never draw a horses legs longer than they actually were or draw an apple larger than a pineapple unless your view point supports it. If I were an ant looking up at a horse the legs would appear to be very long and if the apple is on the table and the pineapple across the room on the counter it would appear to be larger.

Okay so this is what you want to do, first draw the largest mass (shape or form) than the next largest and so on until you can see they are all in proportion to each other. Than the details will start falling in place easily.

*Proportion is a balance of each object in its space and how it relates to all the objects it shares in the perimeter of the drawing. The more you draw the easier it will be for your brain to see the correct proportions. You can draw simple objects set up as a still life or go outside and draw a tree line, barn or pile of rocks. It really does help to draw anything, because every drawing you do will improve your observation of real life.

Drawing in depth is creating a three-dimensional illusion it is only believable if the proportion are correctly represented.

 

*Proportion 1.) Comparative relation between things or magnitudes as to size, quantity, number, etc.; ratio. 2.) Proper relation between things or parts: to have tastes way out of proportion to one’s financial means. 3.) Relative size or extent. 4.) Proportions, dimensions or size: a rock of gigantic proportions.    5.) A portion or part in its relation to the whole: A large proportion of the debt remains.

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Drawing Form

Drawing form is not as hard as you would think. All of us follow the same procedure. We start with the largest objects shape first and smaller next and so on. We don’t add the details until all the form are in place. So let’s get started.

The first step is to pick your point of view, draw an outline or silhouette of the largest form or shape. After you have identified the correct proportion draw the next object’s form (shape). At this stage we are only drawing the forms of each object or subject. You are just the forms you see. Does its outer line form a sphere, triangle, square or cylinder? Is there one or more than one form in the subject or object you are drawing? Making sure you study these objects. Identify what form or forms do you see?

Every object falls into one of the basic form or a combination of forms. Draw each form all the way through to make sure you have the correct space between each object. This part of your drawing must be correct so you can create an illusion of real life from the start.

Draw through form (2)

Drawing each form through

Next be sure that all your forms have the same light source and start forming the shadows. This will strengthen the forms illusion of three- dimensional. Finally start adding the details. Working on your drawing from here should be easier since you have everything in proportion and in the correct perspective.

Form with shadow

As you can see from the illustration above the forms have one light source and it comes from the upper right of the forms setting the shadows to the left and on other objects.

Identifying form becomes second nature as you study and apply these shapes to objects and subjects around you.

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

See how many forms you can identify in my drawing. The outline of the dog that is the biggest. How many forms make up his body? Head? Legs?

You can do this exercise with all the objects you see.  If you started a file you can look at those picture to see what forms lie within each.

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Form Is Shape and Structure

Everything from a seed to a tree has form. Everything that exists has form. Form is something you see and feel.

Form has three dimensions, height, weight and depth. If you go to pick up an object you instinctively know your hand must go around it. So when you are drawing an object or subject you are creating an illusion of a real form. You are creating real life on a visual level.

Your paper or board is a two-dimensional surface. It has four sides up, down, left, right. You create a new dimension on the surface, depth. When you draw an object you are drawing a three-dimensional object on a two-dimensional surface. You are showing the depth of the object or subject on a surface that has no depth at all.

Okay so now you understand the difference between the two. How do you get started? By creating the feeling of depth with perspective line, light and shadow. Every form cast a shadow when light hits it. So to show the form we draw shading and texture.

When you draw the form it must exist in the space, so be sure to have enough room on your paper. Before you draw the surface appearance you must have a good drawing of the shapes of the objects in your drawing. The basic forms is the first step in creating depth.

Sphere, Cylinder, cube and cone are the four basic shapes. These shapes can be modified and combined to draw anything you can imagine.

Start by looking for these shape in everyday objects. Look at the form so you can become more aware of the height, width and depth of the form. Take an apple it has the basic shape of the sphere, that’s where you start.

I suggest you find these forms and draw them without detail, just draw the form as a solid object showing how we use light and shadow to fill in the form.

20140206_141921-1

The basic forms of everything

Knowing these shapes will help you with the principles of basic form of drawing and is the foundation of art. When you shift your thinking from the obvious to seeing the form first, you are thinking like an artist. Keep in mind that the details build as you feel the mass of forms as you draw them.

The basic form can be modified to fit the desired shape. A cylinder can be tapered or curved, a sphere can look more like an egg and a cone can be made into a mountain.

A convincing drawing of the form is knowing the depth of the objects or subject you are drawing. As you study the three-dimensional form take note of everything you see, the light, shadow and structure of the object. Don’t worry so much about the outline it has no depth.

Artist draw from the inside out. We construct each object or subject to create a three dimensional effect. The shape is the largest part of your drawing. Combining the basic shapes are in so many things we see in everyday life. Take an automobile it has a cubes with rounded corners, circles and cylinders for wheels. Legs become modified cylinders and a head becomes a series of modified spheres, triangles and cylinders. Every shape we draw has multiple forms put together to represent the shape of the object or subject we draw.

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