Sharing knowledge and my original work

I Know Your Paper Is Flat

Artist have a great challenge ahead they are drawing on paper. Drawing a form which is three-dimensional on a two-dimensional or flat surface and you are creating an illusion of a mass or solid form on paper.

Most start out drawing their objects or subjects to flat. When they have more than one object they have a tendency to run one object into the next. Leaving their picture with no clear indication of where the spaces are between them.

When you see an object you must see it as if it has a clear box around it. Than you will see how it relates to the space on your paper. This is really important when you have more than one objects or subjects in your picture.

With that in mind you are creating an illusion of reality. Which object is in front, to the side, are they staggered or on top of each other. Does your picture allow the space for each object in every direction?

Take the four basic forms and arrange them on a table with one light source. Now take an empty picture frame and hold it up in front of the way you want to draw it. Look carefully at each form, take mental notes on where it is and how it affects the objects around it.

Three-dimensional form exist in space. So when you do this exercise move the frame from side to side, closer and further way and you can see that even though some times the form is outside the frame inside the frame you still have the illusion that it is there. This exercise is to help train your brain to see form in space so you can create the feeling of space.

Stand in front of a window look out the window as if it was a piece of paper. You can see how each thing you see has its own space. Now look at how they relates to each other. If the Glass was your picture you could look into the drawing not just at it. You are creating the sense of depth and space.

Remember that space stretches in all direction and every form must exist in it. Here are some terms you may or may not know.

Foreground – 1.)  The ground or parts situated, or represented as situated, in the front; the portion of a scene nearest to the viewer (opposed to background ). 2.)  A prominent or important position; forefront.

Background Fine Arts. a.) the part of a painted or carved surface against which represented objects and forms are perceived or depicted: a portrait against a purple background. b.) the part of an image represented as being at maximum distance from the frontal plane.

Perspective1.) A technique of depicting volumes and spatial relationships on a flat surface. Compare aerial perspective, linear perspective. 2.) A picture employing this technique, especially one in which it is prominent: an architect’s perspective of a house. 3.) A visible scene, especially one extending to a distance; vista: a perspective on the main axis of an estate. 4.) The state of existing in space before the eye: The elevations look all right, but the building’s composition is a failure in perspective. 5.) The state of one’s ideas, the facts known to one, etc., in having a meaningful interrelationship: You have to live here a few years to see local conditions in perspective.

Okay so know that you have these tools you can start to see form in its relationship to space. When you create your drawing keep in mind the space and perspective of what you are drawing. Light and shade emphasize the solidity of the construction of your drawing.

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