Sharing knowledge and my original work

Perspective

Texture And Color Add Balance With Depth

Creating texture with color and  with each pencil stroke or brush stroke is another way our picture area comes alive. adding color set a tone enhancing the illusion of the composition.

Every time I pick up a brush or pencil I have to make a decision to fill the picture area by setting the key. The picture area is composed of smaller picture areas. Each shape is a smaller picture area that can be filled to create the larger picture area.

Take these sections of a painting I have done, look how these sections fill the main picture area.

Each section of the picture supports the key to this art.

I love to break down the color in the fur of an animal of feathers of a bird by carrying by making the colors the texture. Building an added depth to the perspective of my subjects. Texture  in color can be become the camouflage leaving you with a piece that draws you into the center of interest with ease.

Useing color and textures in acrylic

Tree Frogs use color and textures to hide.

 

 

Artist using acrylics to fill the picture area with color and texture.

Louisiana Tree Frog

As you can see above there is more than one way to create using color and texture. The patterns in color is just one way I show areas of balance and creating the keys in the art work. Pencil is fun here you can see how texture in shades of the gray scale create balance that is throughout the picture area.

Monkeys in pencil

Using texture to create an feeling of depth and details.

 

So much of my art is about the movement between the subject and the way I draw you in to see that they are a part of this world. If your eye lingers on the subject you will see that section is filled by textures that create the fur just by my pencil stroke.

 

 

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Elements of Composition In Action

The artist that tackle action as the focal point must take a careful and sensitive placement of all the elements in the picture area. Composition is drawing a clear, sharp and simple foreground and background with the subjects in the middle ground.

Come up with a composition that is subtle is the goal. In this example there are lovers in the park sitting at a picnic table. Keeping the four elements of composition in mind as you build your vision on paper.

The over-all picture areas composition is filled with the shape of the main characters to include the two people and the picnic table. How do you utilize the picture area with a form containing the main subjects? Can you have the two people stand out in the form? The answer is yes but the placement is critical because the line they form will be subtle.

The two-dimensional pattern you are drawing is important. The challenge is to create depth inside the form. You can create a strong feeling of depth. Making the figures and the action stand out by setting them at the far end of the picnic table will lead your eye in this composition. The perspective comes alive with a dark table, carry your eyes back in the space to the figures creating the action.

Now think about how the invisible line in this composition and how it effects the picture the area. The contrast between the invisible circular lines and the obvious straight lines of the table along with the landscape will draw your attention to the center of interest. Pay attention to the relationship of the figures. They create the top of the form.

Their heads are facing each other and they are holding hands creating the circular line. This invisible circular line stands out against the straight lines. The vertical lines converge to the vanishing point just beyond the figures heads. The horizon runs three quarters of the picture area just about eye level of the two figures. All hard lines lead to the center of interest.

The foundation is in place. The value of the key is what sets the tone or mood of this drawing. The contrast between dark and light, between the background and the figures heads will draw your eye to their faces. All the other dark and light areas are not in strong contrast blending in value with the foreground and background. The composition is strong because all elements come together to sends you to the center of interest. The subtle choices made by the artist to use a middle key directly affect where your eye travels in the picture area.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Creating A Three-Dimensional Drawing

An artists’ drawing is subject to the opinion of the viewer. The artist who is creating a realistic illusion will want the perspective to be correct and the arrangement of the subjects or objects to be believable.

Start by establishing your eye level and the vanishing point. Now work out the size, placement and proportion of the largest forms and then start carefully detailing the drawing. The largest forms must be established in their space before you can concern yourself with the smaller forms or the details.

The largest form or shape will have many smaller forms or shapes that make up the details. Each form must be in an accurate perspective. Remember all parallel lines meet at the vanishing points on the horizon if you were to draw them in.

Where your subjects are fruit or people the placement of each form will draw your eye to the area you direct in the illusion. Once your largest form is established you will want to add the rest of the forms. Keep in mind that each object and their detail will supported the idea. Every drawing is telling or leading you into a story.

Things to remember when drawing form.

  • Leave enough space between forms when one is in front of the other. If you draw both objects through you will see if the first object leaves enough room for the second and so on.
  • Learn to make ellipses by drawing them in a rectangle. They do not have pinched or flatten edges.
  • Draw a form through constructing the mass before you start the shading or detailing.
  • An interesting drawing with two or more forms has a great composition, it will lead your eye through the illusion into a three-dimensional space.
  • To create a three-dimensional form show the light, a middle tone and a dark space.
  • After establishing the largest shape make sure the horizon lines recede in depth. So the side closer is larger than the one further away.
  • Make sure that your view of objects on the same plane have the same eye level or view point.
  • When drawing an object pick the view that will make it most recognizable.

We have explored form or shape so we can create a three-dimensional drawing and a convincing illusion. You are telling a story of the object or subjects and how they relate in the space they occupy. Having an accurate perspective is essential.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

How Do You Create the Center Of Interest

Up until now you have studied the fundamentals, so let’s cerate the center of interest. Obviously the strongest and most attention getting element is going to be the center of interest.

Keeping that in mind what is the value of the elements you are drawing compared to the background and eye level you see in your vision. Some maybe darker or lighter so you will want to arrange them using the tool learned in the exercise you have been doing up until this point.

If you draw them all the same value you will not have a center of interest. We create the center of interest by showing the contrast of the elements keeping in mind the whole picture area. The perspective of each object or subjects and how it relates to support the element that you have chosen to be the center of interest.

We control the interest by varying the contrast between the elements. The overall picture area comes to life with light and shadows caused by the direction and intensity of the light source and your eye level. You are setting the stage creating an illusion by appointing value to all the elements.

Here is an exercise that you may find helpful:

Take four object a bottle some grapes and a glass, now arrange them on a table.

Draw just the shapes you see with no shading.

Now put in the shadows and when you are finished take your HB pencil and cover the whole picture area, leaving the objects recognizable.  This will show you that your picture area has no center of interest.

Now draw it three more times and each time pick one object to be the center of interest. Each time you draw these elements keep in mind the value pattern in your picture area and the illusion you are creating.

By contrasting the light in the foreground, middle and the background you can create a piece that supports the whole picture area. You are in control of the illusion and setting the value of the composition.

Remember you are in control and you set the pattern to support the object or subject. You control the mood and the direction that the viewer’s eye travels through the illusion you create. When you want an action to be the center of interest you put that in the foreground and depending on the action the pattern of darks and lights you use will support it.

Drawing a boxer hitting a punching bag. First identify the elements. The boxer, the fist, the bag and the light and dark value in the back ground.  I can draw different ways to get the action across one would be to have the bag with a fist wrapped in white tape in it in the foreground against a dark bag. The background will gradually get darker putting the bowers face in the middle ground making the punch or action the center of interest. The pattern can be brought to life buy showing the contrasting patterns in the area of the bag where the fist connects and all other patterns of light and shadow directed to the point of impact.

When you can tell a story with using light and dark patterns around action, object or subject you are creating the center of interest. It is the contrast in the patterns that draw the eye to the center of interest.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Position Is What Matters

Everything looks different depending on the position of the objects in your drawing and your eye level. So when you get ready to draw you must decide on the viewpoint you want to project in your drawing.

Every form you draw will change its appearance as you change your eye level or viewpoints. Our eye-level is seeing the base of the forms on the same level. A hilltop view is when you can see the front surface that the forms are resting on and the space between them. This view is the same as if you were standing on a hilltop looking down. A bird’s eye view is when you can see the surface the forms are resting on and the tops of the forms. Always remember as your view changes so does the appearance of the form.

As you change your view point you are seeing the difference between the form and how it changes its appearance in its space. This is the basic principles of perspective.

The further an object or part of an object is from your eye the smaller it appears. There are no exceptions to this rule. The height, weight and thickness of each form decreases in proportion and so does the space between.

They all seem to decrease in an obvious direction a definite level or height. This is known as the horizon. A natural horizon is where the sky and the ground meet but it is not the true horizon. Your true horizon is your own eye level. It can change depending on your height. It is always what is directly out in front of your eyes without moving your head up or down.

Looking down a street, a rug or a hallway notice the parallel lines of the forms gets smaller and smaller the further away they are from you and  they seem to connect. If you draw a straight line on either side of the object and converge these lines the will meet in the middle this is called the * vanishing point.

These lines are easier to see in a street, a pool or a freshly plowed field. You have to train your brain to see the converging line no matter the size of the form. Start by imaging invisible lines off the edges of all objects around you.

Your drawing may only have one vanishing point which will guide you to keep the diminishing objects in correct perspective. This one vanishing point located anywhere on your drawing depending on your eye level. Objects close to you will all ways seem larger and the ones further away will seem smaller even if they are the same actual size form.

This exercise is to help train your brain to observe how the objects it relates to the space it occupies.

Take three or four of the same object and the same size, place them down a table or a hallway. Now draw them, but first find the vanishing point buy drawing the horizon line lightly on your paper. Now draw the form of the object closest to you. Draw a straight light lines off the edge of the object to the horizon will give you its perspective. Where these lines meet is your vanishing point. Every one of the objects in this drawing will get smaller the closer it is drawn to the vanishing point. If the object is in front of your vanishing point you can draw a light line off the form to the horizon. This will show you the perspective of the same object and how it relates to the space and surface area.

Then you can have two point perspective, it is when you have more than one vanishing points on one horizon line. There are two sets of parallel which appear to converge to its own vanishing point. This will show off angles when we are drawing a view of a corner. The vanishing points may or may not be on your paper. Drawing buildings, boxes and interiors on an angle will have parallel lines converging to the left and right vanishing points.

*Vanishing point 1.) A point of disappearance, cessation, or extinction: His patience had reached the vanishing point. 2.) In the study of perspective in art) that point toward which receding parallel lines appear to converge.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Keep It In Perspective

It is important that your drawings are in perspective. Are you convincing to the viewer? Do this by controlling the *proportions of the objects your drawing. We know that object closer to use are larger than the ones that are further away from use.

When you are building a drawing remember to have your forms in *proportion before you set in the details. Sometimes things just may not seem right, trust your instinct and check all the proportions most of the time that’s the problem. Every object should relate to the space it occupies and to each other

You would never draw a horses legs longer than they actually were or draw an apple larger than a pineapple unless your view point supports it. If I were an ant looking up at a horse the legs would appear to be very long and if the apple is on the table and the pineapple across the room on the counter it would appear to be larger.

Okay so this is what you want to do, first draw the largest mass (shape or form) than the next largest and so on until you can see they are all in proportion to each other. Than the details will start falling in place easily.

*Proportion is a balance of each object in its space and how it relates to all the objects it shares in the perimeter of the drawing. The more you draw the easier it will be for your brain to see the correct proportions. You can draw simple objects set up as a still life or go outside and draw a tree line, barn or pile of rocks. It really does help to draw anything, because every drawing you do will improve your observation of real life.

Drawing in depth is creating a three-dimensional illusion it is only believable if the proportion are correctly represented.

 

*Proportion 1.) Comparative relation between things or magnitudes as to size, quantity, number, etc.; ratio. 2.) Proper relation between things or parts: to have tastes way out of proportion to one’s financial means. 3.) Relative size or extent. 4.) Proportions, dimensions or size: a rock of gigantic proportions.    5.) A portion or part in its relation to the whole: A large proportion of the debt remains.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

I Know Your Paper Is Flat

Artist have a great challenge ahead they are drawing on paper. Drawing a form which is three-dimensional on a two-dimensional or flat surface and you are creating an illusion of a mass or solid form on paper.

Most start out drawing their objects or subjects to flat. When they have more than one object they have a tendency to run one object into the next. Leaving their picture with no clear indication of where the spaces are between them.

When you see an object you must see it as if it has a clear box around it. Than you will see how it relates to the space on your paper. This is really important when you have more than one objects or subjects in your picture.

With that in mind you are creating an illusion of reality. Which object is in front, to the side, are they staggered or on top of each other. Does your picture allow the space for each object in every direction?

Take the four basic forms and arrange them on a table with one light source. Now take an empty picture frame and hold it up in front of the way you want to draw it. Look carefully at each form, take mental notes on where it is and how it affects the objects around it.

Three-dimensional form exist in space. So when you do this exercise move the frame from side to side, closer and further way and you can see that even though some times the form is outside the frame inside the frame you still have the illusion that it is there. This exercise is to help train your brain to see form in space so you can create the feeling of space.

Stand in front of a window look out the window as if it was a piece of paper. You can see how each thing you see has its own space. Now look at how they relates to each other. If the Glass was your picture you could look into the drawing not just at it. You are creating the sense of depth and space.

Remember that space stretches in all direction and every form must exist in it. Here are some terms you may or may not know.

Foreground – 1.)  The ground or parts situated, or represented as situated, in the front; the portion of a scene nearest to the viewer (opposed to background ). 2.)  A prominent or important position; forefront.

Background Fine Arts. a.) the part of a painted or carved surface against which represented objects and forms are perceived or depicted: a portrait against a purple background. b.) the part of an image represented as being at maximum distance from the frontal plane.

Perspective1.) A technique of depicting volumes and spatial relationships on a flat surface. Compare aerial perspective, linear perspective. 2.) A picture employing this technique, especially one in which it is prominent: an architect’s perspective of a house. 3.) A visible scene, especially one extending to a distance; vista: a perspective on the main axis of an estate. 4.) The state of existing in space before the eye: The elevations look all right, but the building’s composition is a failure in perspective. 5.) The state of one’s ideas, the facts known to one, etc., in having a meaningful interrelationship: You have to live here a few years to see local conditions in perspective.

Okay so know that you have these tools you can start to see form in its relationship to space. When you create your drawing keep in mind the space and perspective of what you are drawing. Light and shade emphasize the solidity of the construction of your drawing.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Never Leave Without Your Camera 2

For the love of nature. I never leave home without my camera. I never know if I can use this as research in one of my pieces.

I am grateful that I have the ability to bring a different view of a walk and see some of the things that catch my eye. A camera is a tool to help you capture a moment in time.

The photos you can just take when walking around your neighborhood or your backyard can be done for pleaser or for research for another piece of art. I love my cameras. They are a tool I use to create beautiful fine art photography and research for my paintings, drawings and sculpture.

Sharing these photographs take a long look at the way the light plays a major roll in the picture area. Notice how the light and shadows enhance the textures in nature.

The colors can change depending on the weather. Clouds are natural filters. High contrast defines the shapes in the picture area. The colors are effected by the contrast. The picture area is what you make it.

Have fun get outside take pictures of everything that interest you in different light, seasons and weather. No one said you have to share them with anyone. I know that some of your photographs will be so great you will want to share them. You can share them on every social media site.

Think about what you like to se in a photograph and make a mental note and do your best.

Taking with ditial camera

Ground Spider Web.

 

Taken with phone camera

Fungus at the foot of a huge tree.

 

Taken with phone camera

Close-up Tree Fungus.

 

Taken with phone camera.

Looking up this huge tree on a cloudy day.

 

Taken with digital camera

Love the contrast between the tree and the sky.

 

Taken with digital camera

Eye level of a squirrel checking out the fungus.

 

 

Taken with digital camera

These fungus were not here yesterday!

 

Taken with digital camera

Different fungus growing in mulch birds eye view.

 

Taken with digital camera

Fungus growing in mulch great contrast.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter