Sharing knowledge and my original work

Pencil

Cats Draw Me Into The Cat World

Cats draw me into their world because I love watching them. You join their world unlike a dog that joins yours. I am more of dog person for now.

People like me find them so fascinating it wouldn’t take much for me to want one or two, but I wouldn’t get much work done. That’s because I would be watching my cats.

My dog and bird are enough to take care of at the moment. I love all animals and I like being around them. They are my muse. Everything about them I find beautiful and fascinating.

Cats become my subject matter and the center of interest  a lot. There are so many different kinds of cats painting and drawing them from time to time is a pleasure. Most of them are domestic cats. Some are from the neighborhood, some are wild or they live on a farm. It doesn’t matter to me I love them all .

Here are some of my drawings of cats.

PERSIAN PEWTER

Cats keep their focus on moving objects.

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CHOCOLATE POINT SIAMESE

Chocolate Point Siamese is a beautify cat.

 

King of Cats The Lion

King of Cats The Lion

 

Bob Cat

Bob Cat resting his head on a log with his eyes fixed on something.

 

The fastest cat

The fastest Cat The Jaguar

 

British Short Hair

British Short Hair

 

 

American Short Hair

American Short Hair a cat on the prowl.

 

Kittens

Kittens

 

Scottish Fold Blue Cream

Scottish Fold Blue Cream

 

New Born Kitten

New Born Kitten

 

Mix Breed

Minks is a mix breed

 

Cats 1

Cats 1

Drawing these creatures is fun and I just love painting them. The great colors of their fur is an added treat. I am all about the textures that are brought out by color and patterns that shift caused by genetics.

The distinguishing mark that show off different breeds are as fascinating to me as the character traits of the species. There is no mistake between a Tiger and a Lion or a Tabby and a Persian. Painting them is a welcome challenge for me.

 

Cats 2

Cats 2

 

 

Persian

Persian

 

Garden Cat

Garden Cat

 

LEPOARD

LEPOARD

Working on each piece brings me a greater understanding of these wonderful creatures. Watching the way they move through their environment plays a big part on how they are seen or not seen. Some move around your back yard out in the open while Tiger and Leopards can go through the jungle without being seen.

It is hard to keep your eyes off of them when they are in plain sight. I love capturing them in my work and sharing the way I see them.

 

 

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Learning Disorders/ 7 Ways Artist Cope

Learning disorders effect my art. I have ADHD and dyslexia. I transpose letters, shapes, line, reading, writing, numbers and my brain doesn’t let me slow down so art is a welcome gift because it is my greatest learning tool.

Learning the same way as the majority of students wasn’t working for me. I am a very visual learner and I learn quickly. I identify color and shape with everything so you can image how pleased I am when all things come together to create a finished peace of art.

Most artist with dyslexia are very visual they see color, tone, textures and details very clearly they can communicate through their art. Everything we observe is vivid and dimensional, so we can see how we want to recreate it before we put pen to paper or brush to canvas.

ADHD or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is a neurobehavioral disorder which makes it hard to control inattention and hyperactivity with hard to control impulse. Artist with this disability like me find pleasure in drawing and find that painting with water based paints work the best.

Pencil drawing is just part of learning when your an artist.

ADHD artist love to draw and it the first aid in learning your craft.

These disabilities are a blessing once you learn to embraces the possibilities. Low self esteem is the biggest handicap I dealt with growing up. Learning about art is the one place I felt that I good about myself.

How do artist cope with learning disorders while they work?

  1. We don’t see it as a disability because our imagination is so active we don’t take time to dwell.
  2. Learning new ways to put our creativity to work is just part of the experience.
  3. Artist do sculpture, draw and paint. Others become part of the TV and movie industry.
  4. Living as a visual person means your left brain works over time, so the creative process is always turned on.
  5. Live in a world wear color, shape and texture beg to be noticed and we are willing to share our vision with everyone in our art.
  6. Because we have a heighten level of observation we know when something is off. Our sense of balance between light and dark is found through out our work.
  7. Most of our work is highly emotional and shares something personal a peak into our personality.

Those of us that have learning disabilities will try all types of mediums and in doing so we find the process that supports a style that is unique to us. The subject matter is always a large part in how we work. My need to create my vision is what drives me to cope with any disability I have. My imagination and energy is what brings each piece of art to life.

As a young child myself esteem took many hits but as I got better at developing my craft nothing could replace the power I feel when I’m learning something new or creating my art. Look at your learning disability from all side and figure out how you can turn it around to work for you instead of letting it effect yourself esteem at any age.

Visual learning is not a disablility.

My brain left or right adapts to learning what it needs to create a beautiful work of art

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Art Communicates Around The World

Art is recreating what we see. It has been around since the beginning, it is one way we communicated with each other around the world. Reproducing our visions is what artist do.

As an artist I see the ugly, depressed, fun and beautiful everywhere. Animals have always been an inspiration to me. I have so much joy bringing what I see to you in different mediums like drawing, painting, photograph or sculpture.

I love walking into homes and businesses to see what’s hanging on their walls. Pictures and sculpture that pulls an your heart strings, brings joy to the beholder and art that we fall deeply in love with are found there. We are so glad we have the privilege of owning original works.

My subject matter never runs out its every where. Every pet that I see has so much personality but, nun more than my own. Every animals character set them a part from being a wild or domestic animals. They all are so inspirational I just love to capture what I feel brings out the best in their personality.

Grace is an inspiration for me. She is just so funny. Life is so hard when your a dog in a loving home. Especially mine.

   My current Muse

Photo Dalmatian sleeping

My girl grace sleeping with her tongue hanging out.

 

 

I have been working on this piece of art for a short time and you can see how my dog looks at me every time I wake her while she is lying on my bed with me. I love when she lays exactly where she is not suppose to be or hides in the grass. She is an art form, a model ready to be captured by an artist and I am truly grateful she is mine.

 

Each piece of art is unique.

Create depth with light and shadow.

 

 

Grace coming is into view as details emerge.

Pencil build as the drawing becomes more detailed.

 

Unfolding art.

The drawing as it unfolds.

   

Grace's eyes pencil drawing

Art can capture your heart.

 

Detailed drawing in pencil Grace

Drawing with pencil is just one way to bring your vision to life.

 

Finished art work title Sleepy Girl

Sleepy Girl

I think it turned out pretty good and now the work isn’t finished until it is framed ready to sell. Every piece of art I do is an original.  I will be doing more drawings of Grace, she is an inspiration. I wish you could meet her she keeps us laughing. She got her name because graceful she is not. We have been waiting for her to acquire some for 8 years. Ha! Not going to happen.

We have had four dogs and she is the most comical. She is like a cow walking through the room everything bounces she can fall on air and tumble just walking across the room. She is pushy, you know when she want her way. Our other Dalmatians were calm, carefree and they moved so graceful it was beautiful. We miss them.

 

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Texture And Color Add Balance With Depth

Creating texture with color and  with each pencil stroke or brush stroke is another way our picture area comes alive. adding color set a tone enhancing the illusion of the composition.

Every time I pick up a brush or pencil I have to make a decision to fill the picture area by setting the key. The picture area is composed of smaller picture areas. Each shape is a smaller picture area that can be filled to create the larger picture area.

Take these sections of a painting I have done, look how these sections fill the main picture area.

Each section of the picture supports the key to this art.

I love to break down the color in the fur of an animal of feathers of a bird by carrying by making the colors the texture. Building an added depth to the perspective of my subjects. Texture  in color can be become the camouflage leaving you with a piece that draws you into the center of interest with ease.

Useing color and textures in acrylic

Tree Frogs use color and textures to hide.

 

 

Artist using acrylics to fill the picture area with color and texture.

Louisiana Tree Frog

As you can see above there is more than one way to create using color and texture. The patterns in color is just one way I show areas of balance and creating the keys in the art work. Pencil is fun here you can see how texture in shades of the gray scale create balance that is throughout the picture area.

Monkeys in pencil

Using texture to create an feeling of depth and details.

 

So much of my art is about the movement between the subject and the way I draw you in to see that they are a part of this world. If your eye lingers on the subject you will see that section is filled by textures that create the fur just by my pencil stroke.

 

 

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I Am Inspired By

I am inspired by animals, insects, plants, trees and water. Well I guess just being alive is an inspiration. I just don’t know how not to be inspired, I have always lived my life this way.

My inspiration is all around me. I love color, the way light and shadow can changes the same space at different times of the day. Taking a colorful object drawing it in pencil to bring out the contrast of the gray scale from light to dark.

This example of just one of an object that inspired me to take immediate action. The other day my neighbor stops me during my walk to show me something interesting. It was a two foot hornets’ nest. What a great opportunity. I was so glad I had my phone with me. I took a lot of pictures. As I took the pictures I considered the different eye levels so I could capture every vantage point.

Being aware of how the light played on the nest I wanted pictures to reference for the art I would create.  I was so inspired I knew I would get home a start drawing right away.

As I walk home with my dog Grace. I was already putting together some compositions in my head on the best way I could represent this amazing subject. I knew that it would take me some time to execute a painting, so I decided to do some drawing when I got home.

I am so inspired by the shape and the size of the massive nest. I decided to draw it before I paint it.

Sketch it out

I am inspired!

 

Light and Shadows defined

Starting to define light and shadow.

 

Are you inpired!

Filling in the form with shape of texture.

 

Inspired yet?

Filling in the form with pattern in each section defines the object.

 

Inspired buy light and shadow

Continue with defining light, shadow and pattern.

 

Inspired to it paint.

The balance between light and shadow brings the details to life.

 

Inspired to and color

The next step is to clean this up mat it, frame it and add it to the Gallery

 

As you can see from my quick drawing the picture area is full of interest without adding the colors of the nest. I was inspired by shape, texture, light and shadow. This drawing has inspired me to do another from a different eye level.

 

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Keep It In Perspective

It is important that your drawings are in perspective. Are you convincing to the viewer? Do this by controlling the *proportions of the objects your drawing. We know that object closer to use are larger than the ones that are further away from use.

When you are building a drawing remember to have your forms in *proportion before you set in the details. Sometimes things just may not seem right, trust your instinct and check all the proportions most of the time that’s the problem. Every object should relate to the space it occupies and to each other

You would never draw a horses legs longer than they actually were or draw an apple larger than a pineapple unless your view point supports it. If I were an ant looking up at a horse the legs would appear to be very long and if the apple is on the table and the pineapple across the room on the counter it would appear to be larger.

Okay so this is what you want to do, first draw the largest mass (shape or form) than the next largest and so on until you can see they are all in proportion to each other. Than the details will start falling in place easily.

*Proportion is a balance of each object in its space and how it relates to all the objects it shares in the perimeter of the drawing. The more you draw the easier it will be for your brain to see the correct proportions. You can draw simple objects set up as a still life or go outside and draw a tree line, barn or pile of rocks. It really does help to draw anything, because every drawing you do will improve your observation of real life.

Drawing in depth is creating a three-dimensional illusion it is only believable if the proportion are correctly represented.

 

*Proportion 1.) Comparative relation between things or magnitudes as to size, quantity, number, etc.; ratio. 2.) Proper relation between things or parts: to have tastes way out of proportion to one’s financial means. 3.) Relative size or extent. 4.) Proportions, dimensions or size: a rock of gigantic proportions.    5.) A portion or part in its relation to the whole: A large proportion of the debt remains.

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I Know Your Paper Is Flat

Artist have a great challenge ahead they are drawing on paper. Drawing a form which is three-dimensional on a two-dimensional or flat surface and you are creating an illusion of a mass or solid form on paper.

Most start out drawing their objects or subjects to flat. When they have more than one object they have a tendency to run one object into the next. Leaving their picture with no clear indication of where the spaces are between them.

When you see an object you must see it as if it has a clear box around it. Than you will see how it relates to the space on your paper. This is really important when you have more than one objects or subjects in your picture.

With that in mind you are creating an illusion of reality. Which object is in front, to the side, are they staggered or on top of each other. Does your picture allow the space for each object in every direction?

Take the four basic forms and arrange them on a table with one light source. Now take an empty picture frame and hold it up in front of the way you want to draw it. Look carefully at each form, take mental notes on where it is and how it affects the objects around it.

Three-dimensional form exist in space. So when you do this exercise move the frame from side to side, closer and further way and you can see that even though some times the form is outside the frame inside the frame you still have the illusion that it is there. This exercise is to help train your brain to see form in space so you can create the feeling of space.

Stand in front of a window look out the window as if it was a piece of paper. You can see how each thing you see has its own space. Now look at how they relates to each other. If the Glass was your picture you could look into the drawing not just at it. You are creating the sense of depth and space.

Remember that space stretches in all direction and every form must exist in it. Here are some terms you may or may not know.

Foreground – 1.)  The ground or parts situated, or represented as situated, in the front; the portion of a scene nearest to the viewer (opposed to background ). 2.)  A prominent or important position; forefront.

Background Fine Arts. a.) the part of a painted or carved surface against which represented objects and forms are perceived or depicted: a portrait against a purple background. b.) the part of an image represented as being at maximum distance from the frontal plane.

Perspective1.) A technique of depicting volumes and spatial relationships on a flat surface. Compare aerial perspective, linear perspective. 2.) A picture employing this technique, especially one in which it is prominent: an architect’s perspective of a house. 3.) A visible scene, especially one extending to a distance; vista: a perspective on the main axis of an estate. 4.) The state of existing in space before the eye: The elevations look all right, but the building’s composition is a failure in perspective. 5.) The state of one’s ideas, the facts known to one, etc., in having a meaningful interrelationship: You have to live here a few years to see local conditions in perspective.

Okay so know that you have these tools you can start to see form in its relationship to space. When you create your drawing keep in mind the space and perspective of what you are drawing. Light and shade emphasize the solidity of the construction of your drawing.

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Form Is Shape and Structure

Everything from a seed to a tree has form. Everything that exists has form. Form is something you see and feel.

Form has three dimensions, height, weight and depth. If you go to pick up an object you instinctively know your hand must go around it. So when you are drawing an object or subject you are creating an illusion of a real form. You are creating real life on a visual level.

Your paper or board is a two-dimensional surface. It has four sides up, down, left, right. You create a new dimension on the surface, depth. When you draw an object you are drawing a three-dimensional object on a two-dimensional surface. You are showing the depth of the object or subject on a surface that has no depth at all.

Okay so now you understand the difference between the two. How do you get started? By creating the feeling of depth with perspective line, light and shadow. Every form cast a shadow when light hits it. So to show the form we draw shading and texture.

When you draw the form it must exist in the space, so be sure to have enough room on your paper. Before you draw the surface appearance you must have a good drawing of the shapes of the objects in your drawing. The basic forms is the first step in creating depth.

Sphere, Cylinder, cube and cone are the four basic shapes. These shapes can be modified and combined to draw anything you can imagine.

Start by looking for these shape in everyday objects. Look at the form so you can become more aware of the height, width and depth of the form. Take an apple it has the basic shape of the sphere, that’s where you start.

I suggest you find these forms and draw them without detail, just draw the form as a solid object showing how we use light and shadow to fill in the form.

20140206_141921-1

The basic forms of everything

Knowing these shapes will help you with the principles of basic form of drawing and is the foundation of art. When you shift your thinking from the obvious to seeing the form first, you are thinking like an artist. Keep in mind that the details build as you feel the mass of forms as you draw them.

The basic form can be modified to fit the desired shape. A cylinder can be tapered or curved, a sphere can look more like an egg and a cone can be made into a mountain.

A convincing drawing of the form is knowing the depth of the objects or subject you are drawing. As you study the three-dimensional form take note of everything you see, the light, shadow and structure of the object. Don’t worry so much about the outline it has no depth.

Artist draw from the inside out. We construct each object or subject to create a three dimensional effect. The shape is the largest part of your drawing. Combining the basic shapes are in so many things we see in everyday life. Take an automobile it has a cubes with rounded corners, circles and cylinders for wheels. Legs become modified cylinders and a head becomes a series of modified spheres, triangles and cylinders. Every shape we draw has multiple forms put together to represent the shape of the object or subject we draw.

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Think With Your Pencil

Think With Your Pencil

The artist builds confidence by research and mastering the tools he or she uses to create their work. They all so build it by knowing their subject. That’s when research comes to play.

Thinking out loud with your hands comes easily for some seasoned artist. As a beginner you may want to start with a well thought out plan. This is a rough drawing. You can draw out your thoughts as fast as your brain processes them.

A rough drawing is where you really get to use your eraser. Test out as many roughs as you want you’re not worried about mistakes or lines left on this paper because it is not meant to be the finished drawing.

Your first thought should be about what is most important in the picture you’re creating. Every element you draw will support this. Some artist start with the outside shapes of the objects, animals or people they are drawing. The rough drawing is filled with shapes, light and shadow. It will develop more detail as the artist thinks more about what he wants to portray in his finished drawing.

Other artist start with guide lined, shapes and the back ground to draw your eye to the main focus of their drawing. This is a favorite of artist who what the action that has, will be, or is taking place. The finished drawing is filled with detail that are more precise.

A rough drawing is where you check the* position,* proportion, *perspective and* textures. The position of the objects in your drawing. Does the perspective support the proportion of what you’re drawing? What textures stand out and how are you going to represent them?

A rough drawing is where you plan out and tell a story with your pencil recording all the options you can think of. Until you come up with what you want others to see and experience.

*Perspective– a technique of depicting volumes and spatial relationships on a flat surface. Compare aerial perspective, linear perspective.

* Proportion – comparative relation between things or magnitudes as to size, quantity, number, etc.; ratio.

* Position – condition with reference to place; location; situation.

* Textures- Fine Arts. A. the characteristic visual and tactile quality of the surface of a work of art resulting from the way in which the materials are used. B. the imitation of the tactile quality of represented objects.

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Drawing Paper

Where do I start, there are different ways you can buy paper. It comes in sheets, rolls, books and on pads. Whether you are drawing with pastels, inks or my favorite pencils there is the perfect paper choice out there for you.

Paper like pencils come in many colors, sizes and range, they go from a very smooth surface to a rough surface. The surface of the paper is described by the “tooth”. You want one that is rough enough to take pencil. The rougher the tooth the softer the pencil. The glossier or smoother papers are great for inks, prints and even paints.

Papers are designed for to suit every artist need. The thickest which is illustration board and the thinnest witch is tracing paper. Choose a paper that is suitable for your needs based on fiber, weight, and surface texture or finish.

Papers:

Visualizing papers are papers you can see through they include

Tracing paper (you can see through)

Layout paper (thicker and whiter)

Bond (used for typing and printers)

Opaque papers you cannot see through they are thicker and include

Ledger a durable, bendable paper used for writing.

Bristol board (comes in many thicknesses called piles which range from1 through 5 with one, two, and three, used for pencil drawing)

Illustration board (the thickest is drawing paper mounted on card board)

The thickness is the ply of the paper, one ply, and the thinnest and slightly heavier than bond. There are many surfaces from very smooth to very rough.

They range from very soft such as newsprint to very hard such as high quality Bristol board. You can erase easily on a harder surface. The one thing to remember is that no matter what type of paper you choose is fine as long as it is acid free.

Sketch books and pads are great to carry along to do a study or quick drawing. The paper is much lighter and not intended for a finished drawing.

Drawing paper and pads have a heavier weight and range in a cool bright white to a warm cream color. They allow you to erase and rework areas of your drawing so you end up with a beautiful finished drawing. Drawing paper that I use have a smooth service and is suitable for most dry media as well as pen and ink.

There are so many papers you can choose from just like the pencils and erasers we use. Finding what works best for you is part of your signature as an artist. These tools are part of your style and they will help Identify you as an accomplished artist.

 

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Erasers Are Valuable

Artist materials like erasers can help or hurt your work. Identifying your tools and how they work is the goal. The pencils best friend is are erasers. There are four erasers I suggest you try out. Practice using them so they will become an extension of imagination.

The first is the kneaded eraser. This tool picks up and absorbs the lead of your pencil or pigment of your pastels. It can lighten a dark area and clean up without leaving any waste behind. Just by pressing it on to the space you wish to make lighter. It comes to life with a few seconds of kneading. This easer can be molded, twisted into shapes, and can pick up soft lead from the smallest of place. It can clean up a piece of work that may have pencil dust, dirt or smudges on it.

Next we have the rubber eraser it is like the ones you find on a #2 pencil. It is used to erase the lines completely made by a hard pencil. Using this tool can be tricky. You will want to erase gently and slowly in a circular motion. If you rub too hard it can damage the paper.

Then there is the art gum eraser it is firm and soft great for cleaning up your work. It will all so erase lines after you do a pen and ink drawing. This eraser will not harm your paper or erase dry ink.

Last but not least is the white vinyl eraser it come in a paper sleeve for easy handling. It works very well on vellum and is sometimes favored over the rubber eraser because it does the same job with less residue behind. This eraser like others will leave residue behind, please don’t use your hands to clean your paper you can smear your work. Use a draftsmen’s dust brush and sweep away any debris from the eraser from your work.

Every tool we use as artist is an extension of our hands. We train our hands to do what our brain tells us to do. These erasers can all so be used as a drawing tool to bring light and shape in to a darken background.

So play with your erasers and have fun remember this is a tool that will help you reach your potential. I take every tool and try to use it to its full potential. I will cut an eraser down to fit my needs, I love this tool.

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Drawing And Sharing Art

Doodle or drawing while someone is talking is who I am. Drawing is the way I keep my mind open and focused on the world around me. I listen better when my hands are moving. Is drawing your passion? It is mine.

I love to draw, taking a subject or an idea and turning it into a creative image is at the core of who I am. I see everything as shapes, shadow, lines and colors. Most people don’t realize the amount of work it takes to master the skill it takes to be an artist. Of all my talents as an artist, drawing is the one that I am most comfortable doing. I just love it.

Expanding on your talent takes discipline. You want share your art with confidence. I know that everybody has a special talent. It’s up to you to take yours to the highest level and discipline is what you need to develop it. I always wanted to play an instrument but I never had an ear for music so that is not one of mine. I know now that I was meant to enjoy the music, not to play it. Yet I can take a subject draw it and create a visional feeling just as you may get when listening to your favorite tune.

I expressing myself through my drawings. I work every day developing a new skill to support what I want to share. Work ethic is discipline. Starting a routine that supports you, your family, and your life style as an artist is hard work.

Are you passionate? Are driven to find out as much as you can about your craft and how to get better at it. This drive is what will bring your talent to the world.

There are different ways of drawing.

  •  Working drawing.It is done to guide you in another medium such as painting. This type of drawing is filled with as much detail as you can get, so you can then transfer on to any workable service.
  •   Rough drawings. These are drawing done to pick out the best composition and give you a rough idea on how your piece of art can look when it is finished.
  • The finished drawing is done with different degrees of shading that bring the drawing to a beautiful finished piece of art. Every drawing, starts out with a general form using a light pencil, gradually getting darker by using softer pencils as the details are brought in. The different pencils ranging from hard to soft and the pencil strokes we use will create a one of a kind piece.

Every pencil drawing is important so do your research. A working drawing will guide you to your finished piece. Learning how to take lines and transform them into shapes filled with shadows and a direct light source is the key. If you are just starting out the drawings maybe primitive, don’t worry they will get better over time.

Learn your shapes and look for them in light, shadow and proportion. The placement of your subject matter in the frame of your drawing is the composition. You will want to place it where it will draw the most interest by drawing the viewer’s eye into the frame and holding it until you have achieved the feeling or message you’re trying to portray.

By sharing your drawing you can bring your art alive. So take your talent to the highest level. Then sit back and enjoy your work with confidence and be grateful you can.

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

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