Sharing knowledge and my original work

Drawing form

I Am Inspired By

I am inspired by animals, insects, plants, trees and water. Well I guess just being alive is an inspiration. I just don’t know how not to be inspired, I have always lived my life this way.

My inspiration is all around me. I love color, the way light and shadow can changes the same space at different times of the day. Taking a colorful object drawing it in pencil to bring out the contrast of the gray scale from light to dark.

This example of just one of an object that inspired me to take immediate action. The other day my neighbor stops me during my walk to show me something interesting. It was a two foot hornets’ nest. What a great opportunity. I was so glad I had my phone with me. I took a lot of pictures. As I took the pictures I considered the different eye levels so I could capture every vantage point.

Being aware of how the light played on the nest I wanted pictures to reference for the art I would create.  I was so inspired I knew I would get home a start drawing right away.

As I walk home with my dog Grace. I was already putting together some compositions in my head on the best way I could represent this amazing subject. I knew that it would take me some time to execute a painting, so I decided to do some drawing when I got home.

I am so inspired by the shape and the size of the massive nest. I decided to draw it before I paint it.

Sketch it out

I am inspired!

 

Light and Shadows defined

Starting to define light and shadow.

 

Are you inpired!

Filling in the form with shape of texture.

 

Inspired yet?

Filling in the form with pattern in each section defines the object.

 

Inspired buy light and shadow

Continue with defining light, shadow and pattern.

 

Inspired to it paint.

The balance between light and shadow brings the details to life.

 

Inspired to and color

The next step is to clean this up mat it, frame it and add it to the Gallery

 

As you can see from my quick drawing the picture area is full of interest without adding the colors of the nest. I was inspired by shape, texture, light and shadow. This drawing has inspired me to do another from a different eye level.

 

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Position Is What Matters

Everything looks different depending on the position of the objects in your drawing and your eye level. So when you get ready to draw you must decide on the viewpoint you want to project in your drawing.

Every form you draw will change its appearance as you change your eye level or viewpoints. Our eye-level is seeing the base of the forms on the same level. A hilltop view is when you can see the front surface that the forms are resting on and the space between them. This view is the same as if you were standing on a hilltop looking down. A bird’s eye view is when you can see the surface the forms are resting on and the tops of the forms. Always remember as your view changes so does the appearance of the form.

As you change your view point you are seeing the difference between the form and how it changes its appearance in its space. This is the basic principles of perspective.

The further an object or part of an object is from your eye the smaller it appears. There are no exceptions to this rule. The height, weight and thickness of each form decreases in proportion and so does the space between.

They all seem to decrease in an obvious direction a definite level or height. This is known as the horizon. A natural horizon is where the sky and the ground meet but it is not the true horizon. Your true horizon is your own eye level. It can change depending on your height. It is always what is directly out in front of your eyes without moving your head up or down.

Looking down a street, a rug or a hallway notice the parallel lines of the forms gets smaller and smaller the further away they are from you and  they seem to connect. If you draw a straight line on either side of the object and converge these lines the will meet in the middle this is called the * vanishing point.

These lines are easier to see in a street, a pool or a freshly plowed field. You have to train your brain to see the converging line no matter the size of the form. Start by imaging invisible lines off the edges of all objects around you.

Your drawing may only have one vanishing point which will guide you to keep the diminishing objects in correct perspective. This one vanishing point located anywhere on your drawing depending on your eye level. Objects close to you will all ways seem larger and the ones further away will seem smaller even if they are the same actual size form.

This exercise is to help train your brain to observe how the objects it relates to the space it occupies.

Take three or four of the same object and the same size, place them down a table or a hallway. Now draw them, but first find the vanishing point buy drawing the horizon line lightly on your paper. Now draw the form of the object closest to you. Draw a straight light lines off the edge of the object to the horizon will give you its perspective. Where these lines meet is your vanishing point. Every one of the objects in this drawing will get smaller the closer it is drawn to the vanishing point. If the object is in front of your vanishing point you can draw a light line off the form to the horizon. This will show you the perspective of the same object and how it relates to the space and surface area.

Then you can have two point perspective, it is when you have more than one vanishing points on one horizon line. There are two sets of parallel which appear to converge to its own vanishing point. This will show off angles when we are drawing a view of a corner. The vanishing points may or may not be on your paper. Drawing buildings, boxes and interiors on an angle will have parallel lines converging to the left and right vanishing points.

*Vanishing point 1.) A point of disappearance, cessation, or extinction: His patience had reached the vanishing point. 2.) In the study of perspective in art) that point toward which receding parallel lines appear to converge.

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Keep It In Perspective

It is important that your drawings are in perspective. Are you convincing to the viewer? Do this by controlling the *proportions of the objects your drawing. We know that object closer to use are larger than the ones that are further away from use.

When you are building a drawing remember to have your forms in *proportion before you set in the details. Sometimes things just may not seem right, trust your instinct and check all the proportions most of the time that’s the problem. Every object should relate to the space it occupies and to each other

You would never draw a horses legs longer than they actually were or draw an apple larger than a pineapple unless your view point supports it. If I were an ant looking up at a horse the legs would appear to be very long and if the apple is on the table and the pineapple across the room on the counter it would appear to be larger.

Okay so this is what you want to do, first draw the largest mass (shape or form) than the next largest and so on until you can see they are all in proportion to each other. Than the details will start falling in place easily.

*Proportion is a balance of each object in its space and how it relates to all the objects it shares in the perimeter of the drawing. The more you draw the easier it will be for your brain to see the correct proportions. You can draw simple objects set up as a still life or go outside and draw a tree line, barn or pile of rocks. It really does help to draw anything, because every drawing you do will improve your observation of real life.

Drawing in depth is creating a three-dimensional illusion it is only believable if the proportion are correctly represented.

 

*Proportion 1.) Comparative relation between things or magnitudes as to size, quantity, number, etc.; ratio. 2.) Proper relation between things or parts: to have tastes way out of proportion to one’s financial means. 3.) Relative size or extent. 4.) Proportions, dimensions or size: a rock of gigantic proportions.    5.) A portion or part in its relation to the whole: A large proportion of the debt remains.

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Drawing Form

Drawing form is not as hard as you would think. All of us follow the same procedure. We start with the largest objects shape first and smaller next and so on. We don’t add the details until all the form are in place. So let’s get started.

The first step is to pick your point of view, draw an outline or silhouette of the largest form or shape. After you have identified the correct proportion draw the next object’s form (shape). At this stage we are only drawing the forms of each object or subject. You are just the forms you see. Does its outer line form a sphere, triangle, square or cylinder? Is there one or more than one form in the subject or object you are drawing? Making sure you study these objects. Identify what form or forms do you see?

Every object falls into one of the basic form or a combination of forms. Draw each form all the way through to make sure you have the correct space between each object. This part of your drawing must be correct so you can create an illusion of real life from the start.

Draw through form (2)

Drawing each form through

Next be sure that all your forms have the same light source and start forming the shadows. This will strengthen the forms illusion of three- dimensional. Finally start adding the details. Working on your drawing from here should be easier since you have everything in proportion and in the correct perspective.

Form with shadow

As you can see from the illustration above the forms have one light source and it comes from the upper right of the forms setting the shadows to the left and on other objects.

Identifying form becomes second nature as you study and apply these shapes to objects and subjects around you.

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

See how many forms you can identify in my drawing. The outline of the dog that is the biggest. How many forms make up his body? Head? Legs?

You can do this exercise with all the objects you see.  If you started a file you can look at those picture to see what forms lie within each.

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Form Is Shape and Structure

Everything from a seed to a tree has form. Everything that exists has form. Form is something you see and feel.

Form has three dimensions, height, weight and depth. If you go to pick up an object you instinctively know your hand must go around it. So when you are drawing an object or subject you are creating an illusion of a real form. You are creating real life on a visual level.

Your paper or board is a two-dimensional surface. It has four sides up, down, left, right. You create a new dimension on the surface, depth. When you draw an object you are drawing a three-dimensional object on a two-dimensional surface. You are showing the depth of the object or subject on a surface that has no depth at all.

Okay so now you understand the difference between the two. How do you get started? By creating the feeling of depth with perspective line, light and shadow. Every form cast a shadow when light hits it. So to show the form we draw shading and texture.

When you draw the form it must exist in the space, so be sure to have enough room on your paper. Before you draw the surface appearance you must have a good drawing of the shapes of the objects in your drawing. The basic forms is the first step in creating depth.

Sphere, Cylinder, cube and cone are the four basic shapes. These shapes can be modified and combined to draw anything you can imagine.

Start by looking for these shape in everyday objects. Look at the form so you can become more aware of the height, width and depth of the form. Take an apple it has the basic shape of the sphere, that’s where you start.

I suggest you find these forms and draw them without detail, just draw the form as a solid object showing how we use light and shadow to fill in the form.

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The basic forms of everything

Knowing these shapes will help you with the principles of basic form of drawing and is the foundation of art. When you shift your thinking from the obvious to seeing the form first, you are thinking like an artist. Keep in mind that the details build as you feel the mass of forms as you draw them.

The basic form can be modified to fit the desired shape. A cylinder can be tapered or curved, a sphere can look more like an egg and a cone can be made into a mountain.

A convincing drawing of the form is knowing the depth of the objects or subject you are drawing. As you study the three-dimensional form take note of everything you see, the light, shadow and structure of the object. Don’t worry so much about the outline it has no depth.

Artist draw from the inside out. We construct each object or subject to create a three dimensional effect. The shape is the largest part of your drawing. Combining the basic shapes are in so many things we see in everyday life. Take an automobile it has a cubes with rounded corners, circles and cylinders for wheels. Legs become modified cylinders and a head becomes a series of modified spheres, triangles and cylinders. Every shape we draw has multiple forms put together to represent the shape of the object or subject we draw.

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